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Q+A

7 Useful Things You Can Do Between Drafts

Many thanks to Juanma, who asks this pertinent writing Q: Almost everyone agrees the best thing to do after you finish the first draft is to take a break from the story in order to have a clearer mindset when you come back to the script. But what should I do during that time? The answer to this query obviously depends on the individual, especially ‘where’ s/he is in terms of the drafting process. So, if you’ve developed the project for a suitable length of time and ‘signed off’ on the draft (i.e. it is ready to submit)? Then the… Read More »7 Useful Things You Can Do Between Drafts

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How Do I Format An Interruption In My Screenplay Dialogue?

All About Interruption If you want to signify an interruption in your spec screenplay’s dialogue, you have come to the right place. Many thanks to Bang2writer Mohammed, who’s been in contact this week with this writing-related query … Can I ask how to format this correctly? Someone is reading a letter out loud, and the voice of the letter writer cuts in to finish the letter. I’ve done plenty of hunting around but I haven’t found anything on it. Like many screenplay formatting questions beyond the non-negotiable ones (such as font, size, margins, etc)  there’s NO fancy or specific way to… Read More »How Do I Format An Interruption In My Screenplay Dialogue?

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5 Lessons I Learned Pitching

As an unrepresented writer (and even one WITH an agent!), it’s essential to do your own groundwork to get your first foot in this business … And there’s no bigger step you can take than pitching your own material, the baby you’ve nurtured so tirelessly since its conception! It should be noted that every pitch you ever perform will be different. No two execs are ever the same. However, there’s some universal insights that will greatly benefit you. These following lessons relate to a project of mine, The Nth Degree, which is an espionage thriller with a sci-fi twist. This… Read More »5 Lessons I Learned Pitching

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How NOT To Pitch Agents: 21 Tips For Writers

How Not to Pitch Agents If you want to pitch agents, you have come to the right place. One of the most oft-hit articles on B2W is 29 Ways NOT To Submit To An Agent by BFLA’s Carole Blake. So, with LondonSWF around the corner, I thought now was a good time to invite another agent to give her tips … So please welcome Jennifer Johnson-Blalock! Jennifer is a lit agent in New York and is offering her top tips on how NOT to pitch at conferences and pitchfests. There’s some stellar advice here on how to pitch agents, so… Read More »How NOT To Pitch Agents: 21 Tips For Writers

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Top 7 Pitching Secrets From Stage 32

“How to pitch” and “secrets of pitching” turn up in the B2W Google search results all the time – so my glam assistant Olivia Brennan went out and asked Erik from Stage 32 for his top tips on this subject. There’s some great insights and common sense advice here, plus answers to the most frequently asked Qs B2W gets asked regularly. Thanks Erik – and over to you, Olivia! I recently had the opportunity to find out exactly what producers and executives are looking for during a Pitch. Erik over at Stage 32 was kind enough to shed light on… Read More »Top 7 Pitching Secrets From Stage 32

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Structure Spotlight: 3 Things To Remember For Act 3

All About Act 3 So today we’re talking about Act 3, courtesy of  Bang2writer Craig Howells, who left this question in the B2W Facebook group: I’m really interested in the anatomy of Act 3. What are the Dos & Don’ts? I know you need to pay off, and I’ve got my own ideas (which I’m still working on) but I’d love to know your take on it. I’m not a structure purist. As far as I’m concerned, all stories *just* need a beginning, middle and end (and not necessarily in that order, either!). On this basis then, The Three Acts makes… Read More »Structure Spotlight: 3 Things To Remember For Act 3

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Question: Has the standard of screenwriting improved? REVISITED

Many thanks to longterm Bang2writer James DeMarco, aka @jazadal, who asks this in The B2W Facebook group: I’d like to revisit a question I asked you a few years ago. With the plethora of info available to aspiring screenwriters via internet + classes, festivals, seminars, etc. these days, have you, as a reader, noticed any improvement in the quality of submissions you receive? An UPDATE please, if you can. Thanks! I answered James’ original question back in 2012. You can see the original post, here: Have Script Levels Improved Over The Last Decade? So, as requested by James, here’s my updated answer for… Read More »Question: Has the standard of screenwriting improved? REVISITED

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13 Experts Share Their Notable Diverse Books Of Recent Years

With Tiverton Literary Festival on this weekend (Jun 6th & 7th), I thought I’d take a look at some great fiction recommendations for you lucky Bang2writers. I’ve been a follower and supporter of the #WeNeedDiverseBooks campaign (check out the official site, HERE), so following previously curated posts on representation here at B2W, I thought I’d ask as many experts as I could about this. Make sure you check out our contributors’ links and recommendations! As with previous posts on female characters in movies and television, as well as representation of transgender characters, I asked just two questions: 1) What have you… Read More »13 Experts Share Their Notable Diverse Books Of Recent Years

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The Secret of Writing Great Conflict In Scenes: 3 Examples

What is conflict in scenes? Bang2writers often ask me this question. Many believe – erroneously – that characters have to ARGUE to put the idea of conflict across. This is because I’d wager MOST writers think scenes are principally about dialogue, which as we know is a HUGE problem for the spec pile and makes for highly theatrical, dialogue-led scripts. We often hear the old screenwriting adage, “characters are not what they SAY but what they DO”, but writers  don’t always get what this means, or how to implement it. So my advice is: think instead about how each scene… Read More »The Secret of Writing Great Conflict In Scenes: 3 Examples

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How Do I Get Work As A Script Reader?

Many thanks to Insaaf, who left this question in the comments on the B2W resources page: I am attempting to get my first freelance gig as a script reader. I have a BA in English Literature, but no previous experience or formal qualifications for Screenwriting. I wanted to ask, what would a potential employer look for, in my pitch to be a script reader for them, that would be more likely to result in a positive response? First: the good news The good news is, you don’t necessarily need screenwriting qualifications to become a script reader. It is an entry… Read More »How Do I Get Work As A Script Reader?

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